2018 RESULTS

Survey Findings

As a comprehensive survey of employees’ health, The Healthiest Workplace Survey 2018 by AIA Vitality provides employers in Hong Kong with an essential overview of their employees’ wellbeing. By creating an awareness of the importance of workplace health and wellbeing, the report gives employers a greater understanding of the efficacy of their companies’ health interventions in the workplace.

STRESS

Stress levels remain fairly steady in Hong Kong although they are quite significantly higher than the average in other countries surveyed.

HEALTH CONDITIONS

Hong Kong people are on the move in 2018 with more people getting physically active.

SLEEP

Sleep patterns have improved in Hong Kong since last year’s survey.

PRODUCTIVITY

Compared to last year, Hong Kong lost a greater number of days to short-term work impairment.

* Source: 2018 Hong Kong’s Healthiest Workplace Survey by AIA Vitality (2,187 employers from 41 organisations)

FULL REPORT

KEY FINDINGS

In total, 2,187 employees from 41 organisations in Hong Kong took part in the 2018 survey. Although more people in Hong Kong report symptoms of depression than other countries, the number who suffer from work-related stress has dropped even though Hong Kong has the least engaged workforce in the region. Physical activity is significantly improved over 2017 and people are sleeping longer, but diets are no healthier and the incidence of smoking and drinking more than recommended guidelines has increased slightly.

PEOPLE ARE LESS ENGAGED IN THEIR WORK AND DAYS LOST ARE ON THE RISE

Compared to last year, Hong Kong lost a greater number of days to short-term work impairment in 2018, with a total of 78.5 days lost per year from 69.8 days in 2017. More people felt less engaged with their work as well, with 27.9% reporting “low engagement” compared to 24.3% in 2017. More than twice as many people in Hong Kong felt less engaged with work than in other countries surveyed, where the average was 11.9%.

HONG KONG PEOPLE ARE MORE ACTIVE THAN EVER BUT UNHEALTHY EATING HABITS ARE STILL COMMON

There has been a significant increase in the number of people who are physically active in Hong Kong since 2017 when 62.9% of respondents reported insufficient activity. In 2018, that number has dropped by more than half, with just 29.6% of those surveyed reporting they don’t get enough exercise.

However, diets have not improved significantly, and a steady 79.7% of those surveyed report that they do not eat healthily. Similarly, the number of those surveyed in Hong Kong who were obese remained fairly steady at 21.4%, while 8.7% of those surveyed reported musculoskeletal problems so severe that they had to take time off work.

Although proportionally fewer people smoke in Hong Kong (7.6%) than in other countries surveyed (9.4%), this was more than double the number who reported smoking in 2017 (3.6%). More people admit to exceeding alcohol guidelines in Hong Kong (3.4%) than other countries (3%) and this has seen an increase over 2017 when 2.1% of respondents reported drinking more than the recommended limits.

STRESS LEVELS REMAIN FAIRLY CONSISTENT IN HONG KONG

While 12.1% of those surveyed felt they suffered from moderate to severe symptoms of stress (up just 0.2% from 2017), this was significantly higher than the average in other countries surveyed where that proportion was just 5.8%. The number of people who cited one or more work-related stress factors was down to 57.2% (from 63.8% in 2017), while financial issues remained a fairly steady concern, rising only slightly from 12% in 2017 to 12.7% in 2018. Respondents in Hong Kong seemed less affected by financial worries compared to other markets where 20.3% of those surveys reported “a lot” of financial concerns.

BETTER SLEEPING HABITS ARE ON THE RISE

Sleep patterns have improved slightly in Hong Kong since last year’s survey. A total of 44.7% of respondents reported sleeping seven hours or less in 2018, compared to nearly half (49%) the previous year. Hong Kong compares fairly favourably to other countries in the survey where an average of 47.5% of respondents said they got fewer than seven hours’ sleep a night.

2017 WINNERS

HEALTHIEST WORKPLACE

Survey Findings

The Healthiest Workplace Survey 2017 by AIA Vitality is a comprehensive survey of employees’ health, providing employers in Hong Kong with an essential overview of their employees’ wellbeing. The survey creates an awareness of the importance of workplace health and wellbeing and gives employers a greater understanding of the efficacy of their companies’ health interventions in the workplace.

STRESS

Hong Kong reported the highest levels of work-related stress across the surveyed markets.

HEALTH CONDITIONS

Around 85% of all respondents in Hong Kong reported a musculoskeletal condition in the last year.

SLEEP

Seven in ten Hong Kong people (70.3%) reported problems with the quality of their sleep.

PRODUCTIVITY

There is relatively high workplace productivity loss in Hong Kong, an average of 70 days a year.

* Source: 2017 Hong Kong’s Healthiest Workplace Survey by AIA Vitality (1,021 employers from 11 organisations)

FULL REPORT

KEY FINDINGS

In Hong Kong, 11 employers and 1,021 employees took part in the survey. There are some real concerns in Hong Kong around the issues of mental health, stress and sleep. This is due in part to the culture of working long hours, which results in physically inactive employees. Hong Kong employees also reported poor nutrition and low participation in wellbeing interventions.

THE WORKING HOURS ARE LONG BUT PRODUCTIVITY LOSS IS STILL HIGH

Hong Kong organisations show relatively high productivity loss compared to Australia and the UK, with 70 days on average per annum. Hong Kong topped the regional list for the number of days lost due to absence (not being at work due to illness) and presenteeism (being at work while unwell), with presenteeism constituting the majority of the overall loss — about 65.3 days per employee per year.

Productivity losses fell with maturity. Young employees appear to be facing particular challenges in Hong Kong with absenteeism and presenteeism greatest among those aged 21-30. More senior jobs typically reported less productivity loss.

EMPLOYEES ARE STRESSED OUT AND SLEEPING POORLY

Mental health is an issue in the workplace. Hong Kong had the highest percentage of employees with at least one aspect of work-related stress (64%), and those reporting two or more dimensions of work-related stress (25.8%).

Hong Kong showed very different sleeping patterns and relatively higher levels of self-reported depression, compared to Australia and the UK. Nearly half of employees (49%) reported sleeping less than 7 hours a night. Seven in 10 Hong Kong people (70.3%) reported problems with the quality of their sleep, while 12.4% said they suffered from depression, the highest percentage across the survey.

A LESS ACTIVE LIFESTYLE SEES MUSCULOSKELETAL PROBLEMS RISING

Although Hong Kong employees are broadly in line with others on self-reported health risks, the survey showed that 64% are physically inactive (doing less than 150 minutes of activity a week). Hong Kong tops the list of employees reporting at least one type of musculoskeletal condition, with 85% of respondents complaining that this is a major factor contributing to poor health and wellbeing. While obesity is on the rise in Hong Kong, it is nowhere near the levels of the West.

UNHEALTHY DIETS BUT FEW DRINK ALCOHOL

Few people in Hong Kong get their recommended intake of fruit and vegetables each week with 86% failing to eat their five a day. On the other hand, alcohol consumption was low, with just 1.8% of people drinking more than 14 units a week (compared with 16.4% in Australia).

Concerns about blood pressure in Hong Kong were similar to those in Australia and the UK with 16% of employees considered at risk. Those working in manufacturing and construction were the highest risk.

WORKPLACE INTERVENTIONS ARE UNCOMMON

Wellbeing interventions in Hong Kong are few and the take-up is often low, compared to the rest of the region. Just a third of employees reported participating in at least one workplace intervention.

Back to Top

REGISTER FOR 2019