2017 RESULTS

2017 WINNERS

HEALTHIEST WORKPLACE

FINDINGS

In May 2017, AIA Singapore launched a pilot initiative — the Healthiest Workplace by AIA Vitality survey — a comprehensive survey of employees’ health which provides employers in Singapore with an essential overview of their employees’ wellbeing. By giving employers a deeper understanding of the efficacy of their companies’ health interventions in the workplace, the survey creates an awareness of the importance of workplace health and wellbeing.

HEALTH CONDITIONS

82% of all respondents in Singapore reported at least one musculoskeletal condition in the last year.

STRESS

Singapore reported lower levels of work-related stress than Hong Kong, Malaysia and Australia.

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

A lack of physical activity was reported by 60% of respondents in Singapore.

PRODUCTIVITY

There is relatively high workplace productivity loss in Singapore compared to Australia, but Singapore was found to outperform its Asian peers in Hong Kong and Malaysia.

FULL REPORT

KEY FINDINGS

In Singapore, 14 employers and 1,162 employees took part in the survey. Overall, Singapore appeared to be more similar to Australia and the UK when it came to participating in employer’s wellbeing interventions. However, there are some concerns about levels of stress in the Singapore workplace and poor sleep patterns among employees. There is a culture of working long hours in Singapore, as there is in Hong Kong and Malaysia. A significant proportion of employees reported that they did not eat a balanced diet or to take sufficient physical exercise.

LONGER WORKING HOURS BUT LESS STRESS IN SINGAPORE WORKPLACE

Like employees in Hong Kong and Malaysia, Singaporeans had lower contracted hours than their Australian counterparts, but they worked on average 12 hours over those terms. Taking a break is much harder in the context of Singapore, Hong Kong and Malaysia, with 14.3% of Singaporeans reporting difficulty in this area. However, stress at work was less of an issue, with just 43% reporting at least one dimension of work-related stress in Singapore, the lowest among the countries surveyed.

More than half of employees in Singapore have financial worries, with about 61% of respondents reporting some degree of concern. In line with Hong Kong and Malaysia, Singapore showed higher levels of bullying than in Australia or the UK.

SINGAPORE IN THE MIDDLE IN TERMS OF PRODUCTIVITY LOSS

Although Singapore has lower levels of absenteeism and presenteeism than Hong Kong and Malaysia, these levels are high as compared to Australia and the UK. On average, 51.3 days a year are lost each year per employee.

As elsewhere, younger employees appear to be facing particular challenges in Singapore, with absenteeism and presenteeism greatest among those aged 21-30. More senior jobs typically reported less productivity loss.

SLEEP-DEPRIVED SINGAPOREANS HAVE LOWER LEVELS OF SELF-REPORTED DEPRESSION

Singapore’s percentage of self-reported depression (5.5%) is similar to Australia and the UK, but sleep issues are similar to Hong Kong and Malaysia with more than half of employees (51%) reportedly sleeping less than seven hours a night.

SINGAPOREANS DRINK LITTLE, BUT FEW EAT WELL OR EXERCISE ENOUGH

Singaporeans self-reported health risks were broadly in line with other markets, though employees rated their health as slightly worse than those in Australia and the UK. There is some problem with obesity in Singapore but levels still remain far below the West. Singaporeans drink less alcohol than their Australian and British counterparts (just 1% of employees drink more than 14 units a week) but their diet was the worst in the region with 87% failing to eat at least five fruit and vegetables a day.

60% of Singaporean employees did less than 150 minutes of physical activity a week. Significant numbers across all countries reported a musculoskeletal condition in the last year and Singapore was no exception with 82% reporting one condition.

HEALTH INTERVENTIONS IDENTIFY RISKS

The take-up of health interventions among employees in Singapore is similar to Australia, Malaysia and the UK.

Blood pressure screening is more common in Singapore, which may explain the relatively high level of employees reported to be at risk.

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